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Elliott Moody
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Molden reinterpret construction industry cues in their typographic identity system for Gebeiteld


Molden reinterpret construction industry cues in their typographic identity system for Gebeiteld
Molden reinterpret construction industry cues in their typographic identity system for Gebeiteld
Molden reinterpret construction industry cues in their typographic identity system for Gebeiteld
Molden reinterpret construction industry cues in their typographic identity system for Gebeiteld
Molden reinterpret construction industry cues in their typographic identity system for Gebeiteld
Molden reinterpret construction industry cues in their typographic identity system for Gebeiteld
Molden reinterpret construction industry cues in their typographic identity system for Gebeiteld

Antwerp-based design studio Molden have taken on the challenge of rebranding construction company Gebeiteld following a name change from JvD. The result is a showcase in functional elegance, with a trio of contrasting typefaces and a pared-back colour palette leading the way alongside a refined selection of materials.

The centrepiece of the identity is the wordmark, which is set in Soft Machine’s furniture-inspired stencil typeface Maxeville Construct. “The choice was made because the stencil type resembles bulky proportions and constructed forms,” studio Founder Cedric Janssen tells us, adding that “these forms are usually found within identities for construction businesses and woodworkers.” With Maxeville, he feels they found the perfect typeface to visualise Gebeiteld’s association with these industries “without compromising the aesthetic part.”

Maxeville is accompanied by the equally striking, and somewhat jarring, monospaced serif typeface Latin Modern Mono; a choice that initially came from the client’s request to have an adjustable invoice design. “It is very narrow for a monotype font,” Janssen explains, “and it hints towards technical plans for the interior building projects Gebeiteld regularly use,” further justifying its selection. The third typeface in the trio is the more straightforward Neue Haas Grotesk, which solely appears in small sizes for functional details and body copy due to its readability.

Making a fleeting appearance within the identity is the colour yellow, which Janssen reveals was chosen due to its connection to the construction industry; much like Maxeville. “It has a premium appearance but makes it clear what the company does,” he tells us, “this shade of yellow helped implement that feeling in the visual identity.”

As part of their work, Molden worked alongside STUDIO VERGULT to document Gebeiteld’s previous archive of projects through a series of 3D visuals. With the projects being scattered all over the Netherlands and Belgium in various commercial and residential settings, the duo chose this form of execution as it enabled them to be documented in a uniform aesthetic.

Graphic Design

Molden

Typeface

Latin Modern Mono
Maxeville by Soft Machine
Neue Haas Grotesk by Christian Schwartz and Max Miedinger

3D

STUDIO VERGULT

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