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Harry Bennett
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Order’s identity for research-collecting browser assistant Heyday offers a friendly helping hand


Order’s identity for research-collecting browser assistant Heyday offers a friendly helping hand
Order’s identity for research-collecting browser assistant Heyday offers a friendly helping hand
Order’s identity for research-collecting browser assistant Heyday offers a friendly helping hand
Order’s identity for research-collecting browser assistant Heyday offers a friendly helping hand
Order’s identity for research-collecting browser assistant Heyday offers a friendly helping hand
Order’s identity for research-collecting browser assistant Heyday offers a friendly helping hand

Productivity tool Heyday offers the function of collecting, connecting and collating research automatically, keeping it organised and, importantly, allowing its users to focus on the task at hand. Priding itself on clarity and quality, Heyday worked alongside Brooklyn-based design studio Order on their naming, design and strategy, with the visual result being a versatile and friendly identity that entertains but doesn’t detract.

With simplicity and efficiency driving the identity’s design, Order opted for a hand icon as a graphic motif across the brand, signifying the helping hand that Heyday offers, as well as employing the universal recognition of the symbol. This was then developed into a full library of hand-shaped gestures, each representing different expressions, giving the identity room to adapt to unique circumstances. Fundamental to the identity’s success is the primary and prominent use of Commercial Type’s Graphik family, the geometric forms of which reference and comfortably sit in tandem with the rounded anatomy of the hand iconography.

Bringing these two devices together is the use of green as the brand’s core colour, which is most significantly used in the Heyday’s icon. “We needed something that could be identifiable as the brand, but could also work alongside other content or apps without being distracting,” Senior Designer Garrett Corcoran tells us. “In line with the overall approach,” he adds, “the green is meant to be a supportive colour for what it sits next to.”

The direct applications of these elements result in a graphically poised and flexible identity that has the ability to easily and successfully champion one element over another whilst maintaining total consistency – fortuitously conveying a singular character while upholding a powerful subtlety and nuance.

Graphic Design

Order

Typeface

Graphik by Commercial Type

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