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Elliott Moody
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Studio South’s identity for home delivery service OnSend is rooted in simplicity and transparency


Studio South’s identity for home delivery service OnSend is rooted in simplicity and transparency
Studio South’s identity for home delivery service OnSend is rooted in simplicity and transparency
Studio South’s identity for home delivery service OnSend is rooted in simplicity and transparency
Studio South’s identity for home delivery service OnSend is rooted in simplicity and transparency
Studio South’s identity for home delivery service OnSend is rooted in simplicity and transparency
Studio South’s identity for home delivery service OnSend is rooted in simplicity and transparency

Founded in New Zealand in 2019, OnSend is a technology-driven home delivery company that offers a B2B service rooted in consistency, convenience and affordability. Their service casts outdated logistics models to the side in favour of a fully digital experience, with real-time information provided to customers via a customised dashboard.

To match OnSend’s bold approach, Auckland-based design agency Studio South devised an equally bold identity system for the company; whilst maintaining a simplicity akin to the ease of its service. At the core of their solution is a wordmark set in a customised version of Think Work Observe’s sans serif Studio Pro, which is applied as a large focal point wherever possible. “We were attracted to the idea that Studio Pro’s revival of historic European typefaces mirrors OnSend’s approach to redefining traditional freight operations,” Senior Designer Elliot Stansfield tells us, adding that they “tweaked some of its letterforms to help the mark render well on the sides of large vehicles or tuck nicely into the corner of a document margin.”

The choice of black and white for the majority of the colour palette doubles down on Studio South’s simplicity driven concept, although they chose to layer in a custom-mixed shade of ‘Future Green’ to add differentiation from OnSend’s competitors. Aiming to avoid “classic freight colours of red, yellow and blue,” Stansfield explains that “in true graphic designer form” their chosen green was particularly difficult to replicate with automotive paint; but came out just as planned in the end.

Somewhere between an acidic RGB green and mint, the colour is sparingly applied as a singular baseline; supporting the brand’s typographic components rather than dominating. “From a more logistical angle,” Stansfield adds, “the fleet was already fully painted in stark white which meant this level of usage wasn’t going to require an extortionate amount of bodywork on the growing number of vehicles;” adding further rationale to their application of the colour.

An important yet subtle part of the identity system is the set of graphic symbols that appear across OnSend’s website and printed materials. Constructed to reflect the various stages of a package’s journey, the ‘O’ shaped symbols morph in form depending on the application. “Their original logomark had bespoke bevelled counters in both the ‘O’ and the ‘D’ which we drew from to create the full set,” Stansfield explains, revealing that they chose to use the symbols as a small homage to OnSend’s previous identity while creating a set of functional, flexible and futureproof brand assets.

Graphic Design
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