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Harry Bennett
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Two Times Elliott’s identity for Fussy embraces the unpredictable graphic language of stickers


Two Times Elliott’s identity for Fussy embraces the unpredictable graphic language of stickers
Two Times Elliott’s identity for Fussy embraces the unpredictable graphic language of stickers
Two Times Elliott’s identity for Fussy embraces the unpredictable graphic language of stickers
Two Times Elliott’s identity for Fussy embraces the unpredictable graphic language of stickers
Two Times Elliott’s identity for Fussy embraces the unpredictable graphic language of stickers
Two Times Elliott’s identity for Fussy embraces the unpredictable graphic language of stickers
Two Times Elliott’s identity for Fussy embraces the unpredictable graphic language of stickers
Two Times Elliott’s identity for Fussy embraces the unpredictable graphic language of stickers

London-based design studio Two Times Elliott have developed the identity for plant-powered refillable deodorant Fussy, a product born from its founders desire for more sustainable self-care solutions. This motive is carried across the brand, not only in the concept of the product and its natural formulas, but also in Fussy’s opposition to green-washing.

Inspired by their contemporary and historical significance within activism, Two Times Elliott began with the notion of stickers, using their action and aesthetic as a graphic and metaphorical device. Alongside its sentiment of ‘spreading the word,’ the charming, informal and unpretentious aesthetic firmly roots the brand in the contemporary world, warmly reminding the audience that it is a product and a message for the here-and-now. 

The sticker aesthetic was implemented partly due to the work that had been done prior to Two Times Elliott’s involvement, whereby the sustainable packaging solutions had already been decided. “We explored the original project and created a language with unique messages,” Creative Director James Horwitz tells us, “it was a simple, sustainable and cost-effective solution, this way Fussy didn’t have to go through a whole new round of production.”

Driving the warm and candid identity is the use of Franklin Gothic as the primary typeface – providing a stoicism and legibility that grounds the brand in its more expressive manifestations. It’s partnered with Amen Display Italic as a more lively and expressive counterpart. “There was a need to pair Franklin Gothic ITC with a very characterful typeface that’s quirky and youthful to embody ‘Fussy’s voice,’” he explains, whilst not being expressive to the point becoming obsolete. “This allowed us to develop a bold and playful system,” Horwitz concludes, “which uses the display type to emphasise the idea of Fussy spreading the word.”

Graphic Design
Typeface

Franklin Gothic by Morris Fuller Benton
Amen Display by Hungarumlaut

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