Date
Words
Harry Bennett
0 min read

Workbyworks’ pragmatic identity for Kappa X utilises repetition to signify collaborative growth


Workbyworks’ pragmatic identity for Kappa X utilises repetition to signify collaborative growth
Workbyworks’ pragmatic identity for Kappa X utilises repetition to signify collaborative growth
Workbyworks’ pragmatic identity for Kappa X utilises repetition to signify collaborative growth
Workbyworks’ pragmatic identity for Kappa X utilises repetition to signify collaborative growth
Workbyworks’ pragmatic identity for Kappa X utilises repetition to signify collaborative growth
Workbyworks’ pragmatic identity for Kappa X utilises repetition to signify collaborative growth
Workbyworks’ pragmatic identity for Kappa X utilises repetition to signify collaborative growth

Shanghai-based creative Han Gao, operating under the pseudonym Workbyworks, has developed the identity for Kappa X, a collaborative collection between Italian sportswear brand Kappa and Chinese fashion designer Xander Zhou. Focusing on the concept of repetition to signify the growth of Kappa through collaboration, and the breadth of choice across the Kappa line, Gao stripped the identity to its core, utilising the power of fundamental graphic sensibilities in colour, type and form.

Choosing Helvetica Neue as the solitary typeface across the collection, Gao explains, “the idea is not to be attractive with the typeface but leave more space for the concept of the binary system,” noting how the typeface still remains the greatest default sans serif across print and digital.

The binary system in question is a simple device used to frame the repeated logos and, more importantly, to frame the negative space accompanying them. “In order to emphasise the reproducing process, we chose to activate the clean space as a visual language to build up the system,” he remarks, giving the identity a flexibility to scale up and down as required, and not over-complicating the system in place.

Similarly, Gao tells us how the decision for a limited, monochromatic colour palette was also a pragmatic, future-facing choice. “This is the first collection, where we are moving from 0 to 1,” he notes, “black and white have the best potential and room for other colours to come after,” concluding, “this is just the beginning.”

Graphic Design
Typeface

Helvetica Neue by Max Miedinger and Edouard Hoffmann

Share