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Harry Bennett
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Nash Projects’ airy identity for singer-songwriter T. H. Agyei presents the artist as an author


Nash Projects’ airy identity for singer-songwriter T. H. Agyei presents the artist as an author
Nash Projects’ airy identity for singer-songwriter T. H. Agyei presents the artist as an author
Nash Projects’ airy identity for singer-songwriter T. H. Agyei presents the artist as an author
Nash Projects’ airy identity for singer-songwriter T. H. Agyei presents the artist as an author
Nash Projects’ airy identity for singer-songwriter T. H. Agyei presents the artist as an author
Nash Projects’ airy identity for singer-songwriter T. H. Agyei presents the artist as an author

London and Stockholm-based design studio Nash Projects has developed the visual identity for singer-songwriter T. H. Agyei, as well as a striking graphic system for his future releases. “The idea stemmed from the artist wanting to be perceived as an author,” designer Charlie Nash tells us, praising his lyrical and musical talent, “the lyrics are what he wants to be heard.”

With this in mind, Nash translated this concept through the notion of a fanned-out book, resulting in literary-inspired decisions and graphic devices – including the creation of a publishing stamp – all kept in balance through a rigorous grid system, and the consistent recurrence of halftone treated images. Also used to translate the notion of musical track layering, Nash explains, “the halftone effect is a nod to old printing techniques used in books,” adding, “this kind of rounds off the concept of the artist wanted to be seen as an author.” The imagery itself will change release-to-release, with the first EP Airhead using photography of clouds to directly reference having your head in the clouds.

Consistent across all future releases is Nash’s combination of typefaces, opting for Lineto’s Replica as the primary typeface and NB Akademie Mono as its supporting act – whose monospace construction was chosen to reference the analogue printing methods of the past. Needing a typeface to work on large and small scales, Nash explains “Replica fit the bill beautifully,” praising its “clean and bevelled structure,” and the ease in which it sits within the grid, and complements the publishing stamp. “I felt they harmonised well together,” Nash concludes, “neither steal the show, they belong together.”

Graphic Design
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