Moscow Mule create a dreamy identity for KISKIS, conveying the homeware brand’s tactile delights

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Poppy Thaxter
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Moscow Mule create a dreamy identity for KISKIS, conveying the homeware brand’s tactile delights

Created by digital artist and illustrator Varya Schuka, KISKIS is a homeware project designed to bring aesthetic pleasure and joy to personal places. Combining her artistic experience with modern technology, Schuka’s homeware accessories – thoughtfully produced in small quantities – include charming animal sculptures, prints, textiles and jewellery. The beautiful works are elevated with packaging and identity, created by Moscow Mule duo Anna Kabanina and Marina Kondratenko. The aim for the Russian design studio was to create a visual language that communicates the dreamy aesthetic of the accessories in a way that also honours Schuka’s artistic approach.

Moscow Mule create a dreamy identity for KISKIS, conveying the homeware brand’s tactile delights
Moscow Mule create a dreamy identity for KISKIS, conveying the homeware brand’s tactile delights

This has been achieved through a lighthearted approach, centring around a logotype “inspired by the rounded/smooth shapes of Varya’s objects,” Kabanina tells us. “It also references the plasticity of the material used for the production of the objects,” she notes. “Thanks to a photopolymer resin, used as the main material in the production process, every object has a smooth, unruffled surface, and is very pleasurable to touch.” The ‘I,’ for example, captures the organic, bubbly forms, “especially the jewellery pieces like the earrings and rings,” the designer adds. This letter is repeated as a visual device throughout the identity and within the many formations and layouts of the logotype.

Moscow Mule create a dreamy identity for KISKIS, conveying the homeware brand’s tactile delights
Moscow Mule create a dreamy identity for KISKIS, conveying the homeware brand’s tactile delights

To fit with the smooth forms of the logo, Moscow Mule selected Futura, a typeface Schuka was coincidentally already using at the time. “We thought that it was intuitively a good choice because Futura has a very unique, retro look,” Kabanina explains, “which aligned with the nostalgic perception we wanted to create with our design.”

With Schuka’s KISKIS Objects featuring a minimal – predominantly white – colour palette, the Russian studio opted for a subdued direction that is anything but dull; with complimentary bright and pastel blues, oranges, pinks and greens bringing a vibrant burst of energy and elegance.

Graphic Design

Moscow Mule

Typography

Futura by Paul Renner

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